FORUMS

WindyDelcarlo
Jul 28, 2017

Temur Conflagration

0 comments

Edited: Jul 28, 2017

Event: GP Alexandria, Eliminated Round 1

 

Spells

4x Earthchannel Apprentice

4x Ophorion Refugee

4x Coalition Relic

4x Fatresya, Protector of the People

4x Iron Signet

4x Forgotten Lessons

4x Evoke the Maelstrom

4x Melting Point

4x Scorch

2x Planar Conflagration

 

Land

2x Amber Hills

4x Sunlit Highland

3x Wayfarer's Shrine

2x Lush Oasis

2x Frostfire Geysers

4x Flourishing Crevasse

2x Forest

1x Island

2x Mountain

 

Sideboard

4x Moment of Tranquility

2x Searing Script

2x Negate

3x Shal'Draen's Rage

1x The Infinite

2x Breath of Fresh Air

1x Reclamation Sage

 

What is Temur Conflagration?

To put it very simply, Temur Conflagration is a fast-paced combo deck. This deck plans to put together some combination of Planar Conflagration, any burn spell, and enough mana to cast both in the same turn.

 

 

 

Advantages to Playing Temur Conflagration

This deck can clock very fast in an uninteractive match-up. One of the biggest draws to Temur Conflagration is that in any matchup without counterspells, there's a large chance that the opponent just can't interact. A lot of the deck is redundant, so it mulligans fairly well even in spite of needing to locate Planar Conflagration. This deck also doesn't care about your opponent's life total in the slightest. They could have gained infinite life, but Conflagration will still bring them to 2.

 

Disadvantages to Playing Temur Conflagration

Temur Conflagration is very soft to counterspells, especially maindeck. It's very possible that an opponent just points a counterspell at your lethal burn and then randomly kills you because you happen to be at 4. The deck is also mildly inconsistent, with only 6 functional copies of your kill card and the inability to control the game until you find one. Drawing mana for many tuns in a row is a real possibility because it's necessary to have a critical mass of it.

 

 

 

The Maindeck

Temur Conflagration's maindeck is a fairly simple strategy. You keep pretty much any hand with lands and ramp out as fast as possible. The plan to end the game is to end up with a total of 4RRRR such that you can resolve Planar Conflagration and follow it that turn with a burn spell.

The mana artifacts in particular help this goal extremely well. Both Coalition Relic and Iron Signet provide two mana the turn you need the mana most. There's also 8 one-mana elves to help ramp you up to 3 for Coalition Relic and Fatresya. Fatresya both produces mana and can help get problematic creatures off the table.

For burn spells, there are four copies of Scorch and four copies of Melting Point. If you have two burn spells in hand at any given time, using them to remove creatures is perfectly fine. Unless your opponent hurts themselves exceptionally (by which I mean they put themselves within burn range), you should always be keeping a burn spell in hand for Planar Conflagration.

Counterspells are this deck's weakness, and a blue deck running them is a very hard matchup. There is very little you can do about it if they happen to be holding Negate. The best situation here is to hope they tap down for a big threat or use too many counterspells on your mana rocks. If they present a threat and you have the ability cast Planar Conflagration, it's usually best to try it there. The situation is not going to get any better after they get to untap.

Be wary of the potential for burn. If you're against a red deck that might have two Shocks, wait until you have Melting Point and then wait for them to try to burn you. You want to be able to leverage the instant speed on Melting Point to ensure they don't do the same against you.

 

Sideboarding

Sideboarding is how you try to correct the bad match-ups for this deck. This is where you fight off counterspells and other combo or lock decks.

 

 

 

Moment of Tranquility and Negate

These two spells are your biggest defense against blue decks. Post-Sideboard, you can be certain that they have counterspells, even if they didn't start with any. Moment of Tranquility does its best impression of Dispel here, allowing you to use a single mana to protect your Conflagration or the resulting burn spell. Negate is a necessity both to protect your spells or to survive a long game that might consist of a planeswalker win condition. In decks where you want to bring these in, you'll most likely want to cut Fatresya and shave two Ophorion Refugees.

 

Counterspells

+4 Moment of Tranquility, +2 Negate

-4 Fatresya, Protector of the People, -2 Ophorion Refugee

 

 

Searing Script

Searing Script is another two copies of Shock. The infuse is never going to be relevant in this deck, since attacking with creatures and spending 4 mana for a shock is not what this deck wants to be doing. Searing Script comes in for the matchups where you expect that you could just die in response to your burn spell. Bringing in Searing Script means you either want to cut two Ophorion Refugees or two Scorches. I tend to cut Scorch since it loses usefulness in match-ups where you want to avoid dying at instant speed.

In Burn match-ups, Moment of Tranquility still serves the same purpose. If you happen to have one in hand, casting your burn spell on your turn makes them have three burn spells on your turn to kill you.

Burn

+4 Moment of Tranquility, +2 Searing Script

-4 Fatresya, Protector of the People, -2 Scorch

Izzet Spells

+4 Moment of Tranquility, +2 Searing Script, + 2 Negate

-4 Fatresya, Protector of the People, -2 Ophorion Refugee, -2 Scorch

 

 

Shal'Draen's Rage

Let's take a moment to talk about aggro. In most cases, it's likely you can out clock an aggro deck. However, some nut draws from aggro or some bad draws on your end may tell you no, so three copies of Shal'Draen's Rage ensure you don't just die on turn 4. In these match-ups, you'll probably find that your mana dorks get eaten up and Fatresya actually has creature targets, so I cut three Ophorion Refugees here.

Aggro

+3 Shal'Draen's Rage

-3 Ophorion Refugee

 

 

The Infinite

This big beater is a hedge against pretty much the same deck. It's likely that the other deck is holding enough burn to kill you. The Infinite forces them to actually kill you, will kill them if they can't burn you out with Conflagration, and frees up your mana each turn so you have an easier time resolving spells.

In this matchup, you can bring in Moment of Tranquility if you think you want to be the one resolving Planar Conflagration instead of waiting for them to try. If you do, you can cut Scorch to make room.

The Mirror

+2 Negate, +2 Searing Scipt, +1 The Infinite

-4 Fatresya, Protector of the People, -1 Scorch

 

 

 

Breath of Fresh Air and Reclamation Sage

These two are catch-all sideboard cards. If the opponent has any problematic artifacts or enchantments, these come in to deal with them. The particular match-up makes differences on what to bring in.

New Posts
  • monger
    Jul 11, 2018

    Combo 4 Pinnacle of Vigor 4 Seeker of New Horizons Outlet 2 Feed to the Pigs 1 Slightly Mad Tutors 4 Sentinel of Latter Days 4 Poisoned Well 3 Grim Tutor 3 Deceitful Tutor 1 Ancient Ossuary 2 Ethereal Spellmaster 2 Unburied Relics Dig 3 Wheat from Chaff Protection 2 Dispel 1 Wash Away Bouncelands 4 Lonely Morass 4 Unexplored Ruins Lands 1 Murmuring Falls 2 Mysterious Cataract 2 Grim Bastion 3 Shifting Glade 2 Nomad's Township 4 Forest 1 Island 1 Swamp Vigor + Seeker = infinite land plays TODO: tutor diagram, doublecheck tutors, doublecheck landbase, nongoldfish test (lul)
  • Cajun
    Jan 8, 2018

    The Payloads (4) 1x Eternity Witch 1x Kai'Jun, the Annihilator 1x Liguno, Who Transcends All 1x The Infinite The Removal (13) 1x Echoing Sunder 2x Antithesis 2x One//Done 2x Shadow Sky 3x Refractors Gaze 3x Soul Leak The Tutors (6) 2x Tharyen's Machinations 4x Skull of the World The Carrionpult (1) 1x Carrionpult The Rest (11) 1x Echoing Determination 3x Publicly Disgraced//Kept Under Watch 3x Read the Bones 4x Council's Will The Lands (25) 5x Plains 5x Swamp 1x Forest 3x Wayfarer's Shrine 2x Amber Hills 2x Grim Bastion 1x Heart of the Glade 4x Gloomcover Steppe 2x Fungal Mire The Sideboard (15) 4x Seal the Tomb [Counters the mirror... er Holy Grixis] 2x Aether Snap [Tokens and Superfriends, beware] 2x Despise [For when we need to narrow our Council'ss] 3x Duress 2x Revoke [For when something absolutely has to die forever] 2x Antithesis [Hardcounter to our mortal enemy, tokens] Background A while back Xoltan and it's draft matters nonsense made it into MSEM. Most of the draft-matters cards were narrow or dead in Constructed. And then, there was Eternity Witch, "5WW - You lose the game." While it's a terrible spell, it's a great gift! Fateweaving 's 11 mana combo isn't even good enough for janktown, but then along came Carrionpult (ain't Ophorio great) and Oops All Life was born. The Strategy Our goal is a Carrionpult on the field and a Witch in the graveyard, which is actually rather difficult to pull off. The deck's real star is Skull of the World , allowing us to swing 1 of each. Typically we'll activate the Skull on their eot, fetch the Witch, then discard it on our turn to fetch the Carrionpult for the win. The Infinite or Into Strange Territories (cut from the GPD list) can help us reach that 9 mana turn easier. The deck grabs a few toolbox answers that we can grab with Skull to cover our butts, and all else fails, just beat face with Liguno and Kai'Jun, who survive the wraths. The deck needs some more tuning between the tutors, ramp, and removal, and doesn't have much of a backup plan, but when it works... Oops, All Life!
  • Cajun
    Oct 22, 2017

    Creatures (14) 4x Aleud Beastmaster 4x Duskwood Vanguard 2x Red Silk Dancer 4x Surging Kalak Spells (23) 4x Ranger's Guile 4x Fierce Instinct 4x Groundswell 4x Brute Force 3x Infuse Vitality 4x Roggar's Frenzy Lands (23) 10x Forest 5x Mountain 4x Flourishing Crevasse 4x Wayfarer's Shrine Sideboard 3x Guardian's Resolve 4x Tenacious Guide 2x Weapon Smash 3x Echoing Sunder 3x Flex ( Red Silk Dancer, Guardian's Resolve, Brothers in Arms, Technique of Hao'Tai ) Problem, officer? RG Infect aka Feed the Troll is a deck that tries to race the slower and grindier decks of the format by unloading enough power to potentially win the game on turn three. The key point of the deck is Duskwood Vanguard , an unassuming 0/1 Elf which on a perfect hand can swing for 12 on T2 or 18 on T3 thanks to Wayfarer's Shrine and Groundswell. Your mission is simple, land a creature as soon as possible, aim it at the opponent, then fill it full of pump spells and Kalak triggers until they stop twitching. Most decks object this this though, so we've got some extra firepower for them: Ranger's Guile and Guardian's Resolve shutdown all those pesky removal spells, with Ranger's Guile giving them an extra damage (or four) for their trouble, and Guardian's Resolve letting us scry and weather wraths. Roggar's Frenzy is enough of a reason to splash red, letting us punch extra damage, kill Clutch of the Coil, churn out tokens for any late games we find ourselves in, and just generally being a card you're happy to draw at any point in the game. Style points for using it to Frenzy your own Surging Kalak. Red Silk Dancer and Technique of Hao'Tai are our best options for tokens, making sure all those pesky things to run underfoot while providing a body or a crazy Kalak trigger spell in other matches. Tenacious Guide stops counterspells. Eats a lot of removal though. Weapon Smash and Echoing Sunder are our main weapons against artifact and enchantment based decks that prevent us from winning early. Brothers in Arms is just hilarious with Surging Kalak. This is mostly a fun-of card but is good for busting creature stalemates such as buttfighting. Room for Improvement The deck really wants a Gladecover Scout or a sturdy flier, and I'm really considering Swiftfoot Elk and even Winged Envoy for the slot, which would unfortunately means losing Roggar's or splashing two colors, although Duskwood Vanguard would love the fetches. On the flip side, Brute Force is fairly inefficient, and Giant Growth would be better here if we get it. And while the inspiration for the deck, Surging Kalak is really not pulling its weight. Dropping it and some lands for some more 1 and 2 drop creatures, perhaps Interan Soothsayer , may prove the better strategy for quick, decisive wins.

Join us on Discord